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Thread: Are the Culture novels and Algebraist truely unconnected?

  1. #21
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    I'm not sure why IMB is "defensive" of his non-Culture books. I'm not a big fan of Feersum Endjinn, but the other two are very good. And it's fun to see a master take a different direction occasionally. Even Monet would get a trifle boring if he had never painted anything but water pictures.

  2. #22
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    I think TMH is defensive in the sense that he might feel that his non-Culture work is seen to be perhaps 'less loved' hence the perpetual attempts to unify them into the Culture-verse.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sian B View Post
    Where do all the humans come from in the Culture novels? Feel I need some clarification!! Does SF appreciation involve the suspension of all such niggly questions?
    Sian B is asking a good question here. Most of my favourite SF novels only involve humans because they are set in our future. They involve humans that have spread out from earth. The Culture is different. It involves aliens and humans in the past, present and future. It also involves interaction between Culture humans and us.

    As far as I know where humans come from in the Culture novels isn't explained. So as a thinking reader it's natural to try and fix this to make the stories more credible. My view is that there's 2 options. Either humans evolved seperately in different space times as a response to similar planetary conditions or human dna has spead across space. They are both possible so I'm happy with the integrity of the fictional Cultureverse.

  4. #24
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    I think they are actually humanoids rather than humans. Similar to us but quite probably genetically different to us. I think they evolved under similar conditions to how we did. It goes with my theory that if there is life on other planets there is a high chance it is humanoid. Of all the billions of different species on this Earth, only one is capable of intelligent thought, and true diversity and adaptibility. Many species come close to us in terms of genetics and physiology, but only humans are "human". If intelligent life exists somewhere else, I wouldn't be surprised if they were quite similar to us.

  5. #25
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    A fraction of this avalanche of data (it felt like a lot but it was actually piffiingly small, the ship assured us) was stuffed into the heads of those of us sufficiently close in physique to pass for human on Earth, after a little alteration (I got a couple of extra toes, a joint removed from each finger and a rather generalized ear, nose and cheekbone job. The ship insisted on teaching me to walk differently as well), and so by the start of '77 I was fluent in German and English and probably knew more about the history and current affairs of the place than the vast majority of its inhabitants.
    From The State Of The Art - Sma goes through a few changes before she's allowed on Earth.
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flashman View Post
    Sian B is asking a good question here. Most of my favourite SF novels only involve humans because they are set in our future. They involve humans that have spread out from earth. The Culture is different. It involves aliens and humans in the past, present and future. It also involves interaction between Culture humans and us.

    As far as I know where humans come from in the Culture novels isn't explained. So as a thinking reader it's natural to try and fix this to make the stories more credible. My view is that there's 2 options. Either humans evolved seperately in different space times as a response to similar planetary conditions or human dna has spead across space. They are both possible so I'm happy with the integrity of the fictional Cultureverse.
    There's also Star Wars. Which is, of course, set a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.

  7. #27
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    Banksy answered the question 'why are humans everywhere?' in Use Of Weapons.

    They are there to use up the alcohol in interstellar gas clouds.


  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedKing View Post
    From The State Of The Art - Sma goes through a few changes before she's allowed on Earth.
    Typical Culture ship.. I've seen stranger folk down my local..

  9. #29
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    Feersum Endjinn and Against a Dark Background could both easily be set in the same cosmos the Culture is jetting about in, without breaking credibilty, but makes little difference.
    'Poverty is not an injustice. There is no such thing as causes for poverty, only causes for wealth. Poverty is not a wrong, but taking money from those who have it to equalize incomes is basically theft, which is wrong.' - Typical Randroid

  10. #30

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    They actually do share exactly the same Universe, and that's our Universe. And they do share exactly the same Earth, and that's ours, the one we happen to be standing on or sitting on or walking on or flying over or swimming over at this very second.

    The stories in the novels are like the stories in the Hardy Boys series and the Nancy Drew series. Two different literary Earths.

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