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Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #811
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    Finished 11/22/1963 - Five stars, one of the best Stephen King novels I have read in many a year, it even has a proper ending and everything!

    This weekend, I'll be reading a selection of:

    The First World War - Hew Strachan
    To End All Wars - Adam Hochschild
    Marne 1914 - Holger Herwig
    1915: The Death of Innocence - Lyn MacDonald
    George, Nicholas & Wilhelm - Miranda Carter
    Lurker at the threshold

  2. #812
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    Woken Furies by Richard Morgan, the third in a series involving a warrior / general hardcase called Tahesi Kovacs. He is so relentlessly angst-ridden that he makes old Horza seem like a light-hearted soul whom you'd want to have a beer with. In this one Kovacs is back on his home planet (mix of Japanese and Hungarian culture) trying to exorcise his guilt by killing loads of priests and anybody else who looks at him the wrong way. Morgan's books do have some interesting ideas at the back of them, but the level of violence is really off-putting. The tone is unremittingly harsh, with no let up for light relief at all (nearest equivalent I can think of is the 1st movement of Prokofiev's 2nd Symphony which never relaxes below very loud indeed). I almost gave up on Woken Furies partway through, but it's worth persisting with, as the conclusion rounds off, more or less, the series of three books. Not in the same class as Banks but Morgan is worth trying. He's now moved on to fantasy in his latest books, which I think I will pass on. Books about a big bloke with a sword - especially if the sword has a name - I find deeply uninteresting.

    Meanwhile, Neal Stephenson's latest, Reamde [sic], has arrived: I can't say that this thumped on to the doormat, as it's far too big to fit through any letter-box outside of Brobdignag. First impressions are that it involves a US equivalent of one of IB's families with lots of eccentrics - even has a parent who died through being struck by lightning, though she wasn't climbing a church steeple at the time.
    Why don't you go away and read some books?

  3. #813

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    Quote Originally Posted by RedKing View Post
    Tell me if it's any good, it's on the 'shelf' of books to read.
    It's an easy reading style, it's a bit pulp if I'm honest, you really need to know the chronology and family history and I'm not entirely comfortable with a genre that puts words into real historical figures mouths, but I really enjoyed it.
    I want to be Cultured

  4. #814
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    Jan 2010
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    Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card. I'm told it's a classic so thought it was about time to jump in. Must say I'm finding it a real page turner so far.

    In the queue - Philip K. Dick and yet another first time author for me. "Ubik" and "The Man in the High Castle" look like a fair place to start. Hopefully I'll beat the start of the TV series - if that's still happening.

  5. #815

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    The wife got me the full enders saga a while back.
    I just loaded them onto the ereader.
    Glad to hear their worthwhile.
    I want to be Cultured

  6. #816
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champagne Socialist View Post
    The wife got me the full enders saga a while back.
    I just loaded them onto the ereader.
    Glad to hear their worthwhile.
    Yep, he's not your average 6 year old kid.

  7. #817
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    I liked the original story in Analog but as the series of books ground on, I found less and less to like, both with the series and Ender.
    Lurker at the threshold

  8. #818
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    I agree with RedKing, the original short story, and the book that grew from it, was pretty good, but the later books seemed a little bit like the quest for another paycheck. They also end up getting pretty heavily into Mormon theology, which isn't one of my favorite subjects.

    I'm on a Christopher Moore bender right now, a coworker picked up all or nearly all of his books in a used bargain bin, so my head has been filled with semi-competent beta males and fruit bats for a week or too. Light, easy reads, a lot of good weird fun.
    "No, I like my lot as well as any other."

  9. #819
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    I quite liked Enders Game, adult books with kids as the main character can be iffy, but that one worked quite well. I may read the 2nd one sometime (name escapes me), but the Shadow series seems a bit pointless.

    In the queue - Philip K. Dick and yet another first time author for me. "Ubik" and "The Man in the High Castle" look like a fair place to start. Hopefully I'll beat the start of the TV series - if that's still happening.
    PDK is a great author, I read Ubik recently, pretty odd (as are most of his books) but decent. I've listened to the audio version of ...High Castle. More alternative history than SF, but still quite decent.
    A Scanner Darkly was good, Valis was very weird, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep is a classic
    "Just have fun"

  10. #820
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    The Strain by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan - Part I of a trilogy, so I'm expecting this one to be the 'scene setter'.
    Lurker at the threshold

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